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athgarvan

IS THE CATHOLIC CHURCH A MAJORITY GROUP?

Why do attacks on gays, Muslims, Jews, and other minority groups generate a vast examination of conscience, while acts of hatred or contempt directed at Christians generally provoke basic silence? If we haven't heard of many assaults on Christian places of worship maybe it is because they attracted precious little media interest and virtually no condemnations from human rights groups.

Is it because Christians are not seen as a minority group? Historically, Christianity has been seen in the West as a rich, powerful, culture-shaping majority, so the notion that Christians can be the victims of discrimination and persecution is a tough sell. Is this silence simply to distract attention from Christianity on matters such as women, abortion, contraception, and homosexuality.

Perceiving Christianity as a "powerful majority" has little to do with contemporary reality. Of the 2.3 billion Christians in the world, most are in places where religious freedom means very little e.g. sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and elsewhere, and while it may appear that baptized Christians in the West remain a majority, those who practise the faith and accept traditional teachings are not. Even in the West it’s no longer the case that Christianity is a socially dominant institution. Emeritus Pope Benedict described the situation facing Christianity in the West today as that of a “creative minority.”


Comments

When was this? I remember a great hoopla about black churches being burned when, in fact, there was a rash of churches in general being burned.
I notice that the four issues you mentioned specifically all pertained to "sex." This is the area in which there is the greatest diversity of standards in sustainable societies. Monogamy is the normative condition in a minority of societies viewed historically and anthropologically. I happen to prefer it, but hey, that is my personal and prejudiced opinion.

Every tradition thinks that its version of the moral code is the correct one. Catholicism says that the good person is celibate and the ordinary sinful person may be monogamous. Islam says that the good man will be monogamous and the ordinary sinful man be polygynous. A common standard should be based on negotiation in which each view is given a fair hearing. and, of course, women as well as men should have input.

For my part i find it far more consequential that men have almost always set the standards that affect both men and woman than the question of which religious view or which secular view will predominate.
depends on where people are and which culture is the majority
there was a lot of attention paid to the coptic christians and the desecration of their churched in Egypt

obviously everyreligion has a right to exist free from violence to its members and property
but no religion - no matter how great their majority - should seek to impose their views on others
and they all seem to be guilty of it - the followers in the name of the religion seek to limit the freedom of non believers
It's easy to forget that some of us are both members of one of the minorities you mention and Christians.

There are undoubtedly so called Christians and so called liberals who are the most monumental bigots.

A right to freedom of religious expression? Yes.

A right to behave like a bigot towards minorities? No.
You only need to tune into American conservative talk radio to hear about the horrible onslaught by the 2% of the country that is gay and the 0.6% of the country that is Muslim against the 78% of the county that is Christian.

In America, hate crimes are tracked by our FBI. Religious hate crimes account for 18.6% of all hate crimes. (Sexual orientation also gets 18.6%, the highest category is racial hate crimes, at 47%).

Of the 18.6% of hate crimes that are religious in nature, 56.8% are perpetrated against Jews, 16.1% against Muslims (even though Muslims are a tiny minority here), Catholics get 6.1% and Protestants, 2.5%.

So, in America at least, attacks against gays, Muslims, Jews, and other minority groups generate a vast examination of conscience compared to attacks on Christians simply because there are so many many more of them.